New Financial Aid Policy

New Financial Aid Policy

http://www.finaid.txstate.edu/undergraduate/Courses-Counting-Toward-Degree.html

You may have been notified that Financial Aid and Scholarships is using the degree audit to determine whether courses are applying to your degree and are therefore eligible for financial aid. If you see a course that is not counting towards your degree, you will need to speak with your graduate advisor. Substitutions that are petitioned by your graduate advisor and approved by the graduate dean will show as approved and counting on your degree audit. You can also refer to course requirements as listed in the Graduate Catalog

What is the Course Counting Requirement?

As a financial aid recipient, the federal government requires that your aid eligibility only be based on those courses that count toward the completion of your degree. So to be considered a full-time student for financial aid purposes, you would want to enroll in 12 credit hours as an undergraduate (or 9 credit hours as a graduate) that count toward your degree. Remember, to be eligible for most financial aid, you only need to be enrolled at least half-time (6 hours for undergraduates and 5 hours for graduates).

In how many hours do I need to enroll?

As a financial aid recipient, we encourage you to only take the courses that count toward the completion of your degree. However, to be considered a full-time student for financial aid purposes, you would want to enroll in at least 12 credit hours as an undergraduate (or 9 credit hours as a graduate) that count toward your degree. Remember, to be eligible for most financial aid, you only need to be enrolled at least half-time (6 hours for undergraduates and 5 hours for graduates).

How does going from Full-time to half-time affect my financial aid?

The Cost of Attendance, or COA, is the combination of your expected direct and indirect educational costs. This total is used to determine the maximum amount of aid that you can receive. A COA is required by the federal government to ensure tax-payer funded financial assistance does not exceed a student’s educational costs.

So if you go from full-time to half-time status, you will not be paying as much for certain expenses. Since you are not incurring the full-time costs of tuition and fees as well as books and supplies, that part of your COA is reduced as shown in the example below. However, your other educational costs such as room and board are not adjusted.

What if a course is not being counted for my aid eligibility?

Your financial aid will be calculated based only on the number of hours for which you are enrolled and count toward your degree. You should always reference your degree audit and course catalog as to what courses count toward your degree. If you believe a course does count toward your degree but is not being counted as a financial aid eligible course, contact your academic advisor.

What if I am retaking a course?

You are allowed to repeat a previously passed course that counts towards your degree once. Second and subsequent repeats of previously passed course are not financial aid eligible. The only exception is for courses that are required to be taken multiple times (using the same course number throughout a degree program) and where the content is different each time it is taken.

What about a study abroad or independent study course?

As with any other course, the study abroad or independent study course must count toward your degree to be aid eligible.

What if I drop all the courses counting towards my degree but remain enrolled in other courses?

Only courses that count toward your degree are considered aid eligible. If you drop all the courses that count toward your degree and remain enrolled in only courses that do not count toward your degree, you may be required to repay all or a portion of your financial aid.